2013-14 Unit Plan
Fine Arts, General

Mission Statement

Art has been an integral part of human culture for over 30,000 years.  Preceding the written word by perhaps 25,000 years, it was one of the first durable and enduring modes of expression and identity.  In early small-scale societies, the artist was often associated with spiritual and metaphysical powers.  As culture became more complex, art and drama were recognized as a potent way of communicating religious and political values, and later, as a means of self exploration and discovery.  The rich diversity of human culture is potently revealed through studying their creative products: from the compelling masquerades of Africans and Native Americans, to the beautifully crafted Greek dramas, sculpture and architecture, to the soaring Gothic cathedrals of France.  Eventually, sculptors, painters, and writers such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarotti, and William Shakespeare came to be as important and influential in their societies as the religious and political leaders they served, not only because they created images useful to their patrons, but because their work revealed powerful truths about humanity.  Five hundred years later, these works continue to inspire an ever enlarging audience, many of whom attend or participate in drama productions such as those of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, or travel long distances to observe and study the world's great art collections in museums such as the Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, or the the Musee du Louvre, Paris. 

Several developments during the 19th and 20th centuries have made the creative art-making process more widely accessible.  New media and techniques have been invented, including photography, cinematography, and video. There are unprecedented opportunities for aspiring writers, actors, set designers, correographers, and directors in community theater and beyond.  Synthetic binders have been incorporated into paints, making them more durable and inexpensive.  Stone and bronze have been replaced by wood, steel, plastic, cardboard, and other easily worked and inexpensive sculpture materials.  Small electric kilns capable of heating ceramic objects to 2400º Fahrenheit can be commonly found in home workshops.  Computer imaging technology has placed sophisticated image-making capabilities in the hands of anyone who can learn the software. 

In societies such as our own, in which individuality and freedom of expression are valued as basic human rights, art has come to be regarded as a primary mode of self-expression and self-exploration.  The products of these expressions have pushed the boundaries of what art can be, presenting a sometimes bewildering variety of options.  But the continuing popularity of college art and drama courses attests to the ongoing human need for involvement in creative endeavor. 

While participation in the arts has become easier, less expensive, and thus more widespread, the development of strong, fundamental technical skills and aesthetic discernment remains at the heart of a solid arts education.  Traditionally, the requisite foundation was built during a long and arduous apprenticeship in the guild workshop under the supervision of a master actor, carver, painter, printmaker, or goldsmith.  Entrance into a guild was restricted to only the most talented and energetic.  Community college fine arts departments have a more challenging task in that we are committed to open access to all people, and the goals and aptitudes of our students are extremely diverse.  Yet each of these students, if they are to succeed in their chosen field of specialization, must acquire a core of basic skills and knowledge common to all creative endeavor.  The Butte College Department of Arts has successfully met this challenge for the past two decades due to the talent, resourcefulness, and dedication of its staff, the employment of teaching strategies which reach each student as an individual, and due to a rich diversity of course offerings. 

During the past decade, societal and technological changes offered our Department new opportunities for growth and development and we are constantly evolving to meet the changing needs of our students and their future employers.  Artists are now employed in a wide variety of fields in which a strong background in design, creative problem solving, critical thinking, and aesthetic discernment are essential to success.  In many of these fields, such as Multimedia Presentation, Graphic Design, Industrial Design, and Photography, the computer plays an essential role.  Computers are incresingly used by painters and sculptors as well.  The advanced technology that is currently available offers substantial advantages.  Creative freedom is facilitated by software programs that enable the designer to generate many alternative solutions to a given problem in the time it would take to generate a single solution with traditional tools.  The computer also enlarges the range of possibilities available to the designer.  And this technology is increasingly accessible, both in terms of ease of operation and capital outlay.  Butte College Arts provides students with both traditional and contemporary foundation skills in all aspects of drama production, two and three-dimensional design, aesthetics, critical thinking, and creative problem solving.  These are skills which will translate readily into a variety of rewarding career opportunities for our students in the fields listed above as well as in other related disciplines.
  
The mission of the Arts Department is thus dynamic.  We design and revise our curricula based upon the need of our students for visual and theatrical expression, the necessity of maintaining and developing the visual and performing arts in contemporary society, and the importance of cultural diversity provided by exposure to the arts. Central to the mission is a commitment to quality teaching enhanced by creative artistic endeavors and research of active, passionate faculty, who work closely and individually with students. This close connection to our students stimulates aesthetic and intellectual inquiry in both theory and application.

The Arts Department’s goals are to facilitate student success and self-discovery, to prepare students for advanced study and entry into arts related entrepreneurial and professional fields, and to provide a core foundation of courses upon which students may construct challenging, rewarding and concentrated fields of study.

Program Description

The Butte College Arts Department consists of programs and courses that include: Painting, Drawing, Ceramics, Sculpture, Printmaking, Theater Performance, Technical Theater, Theater Arts Appreciation, Art Appreciation, Art History, the Butte College Art Gallery, and Arts Resource Center. 

The following is a list of the Degrees and Certificates offered by the ADAD Department.
  	AA Transfer Degree in Art:
AA Degree, Ceramics 
AA Transfer Degree in Graphic Design 
AA Transfer Degree in Radio- TV Film
AA-T in Theatre 
AS Transfer Degree in Apparel Marketing and Design 
AS Degree, Graphic Design for Print 
AS Degree, Interior Design AS Degree, Multimedia Studies
AS Degree, Photography 
AS Degree, Radio- TV Film 
AS Degree, Visual Merchandising
 
Certificate of Achievement –
	Ceramics
	Certificate in Theatre Arts 
	Fashion Merchandising 
	Interior Design 
	Multimedia Studies
	Radio- TV and Film 
	Visual Merchandising
Certificate in Fashion Design 
Certificate Level 1A, Interior Design 
Certificate Level 1B, Interior Design
Certificate in Photography

Future Development Strategy

Strategy 1

In collaboration with all affected parties (faculty, staff, students), implement strategic scheduling in light of the recent elimination of course repeatability and revisions to course outlines and degree paths.  Our goal is to maintain the quality and diversity of our course offerings while increasing efficiency.

Initiatives
  • Inspiring passion through collaboration
  • Focusing on student success
  • Valuing a culture of learning
  • Enhancing an innovative, responsive, and accountable culture

  • Supporting Rationale


    Supporting Rationale Alignment

    Strategy 2



    Initiatives
  • Inspiring passion through collaboration
  • Focusing on student success
  • Valuing a culture of learning
  • Enhancing an innovative, responsive, and accountable culture

  • Supporting Rationale
    This work is facilitating student success by clarifying our major objectives for each of our courses, stimulating faculty interaction, and improving our pedagogy.

    Supporting Rationale Alignment
  • Supports Previous Program Review Recommendations
  • Maintaining core programs and services
  • Increasing student success
  • Strategy 3

    Reduce and focus the numbers and types of required courses for the A.A. degree in each of the various Studio Art areas of concentration.  This will encourage students to seek the A.A. Degree in Studio Art by defining more reasonable and well-thought out pathways.

    Initiatives
  • Inspiring passion through collaboration
  • Focusing on student success
  • Valuing a culture of learning
  • Enhancing an innovative, responsive, and accountable culture

  • Supporting Rationale
    In the past, students were confronted with course in unit requirements for degrees and certificates that required that too much time be spent at Butte College.  We seek to remedy this, in light of new limits on course repeatability, and state guidlines for AA-T Degrees.

    Supporting Rationale Alignment
  • Maintaining core programs and services
  • Increasing student success
  • Establishing new initiatives that support the Strategic Direction
  • Strategy 4

    Work within the State Transfer Model Curriculum frameworks to develop and offer an AA-T degree program in Studio Art.  Mentor students to increase their awareness of these majors to encourage them to think of graduation as a meaningful goal.

    Initiatives
  • Focusing on student success
  • Valuing a culture of learning
  • Enhancing an innovative, responsive, and accountable culture

  • Supporting Rationale
    Students who complete an AA-T degree in Studio Art are more likely to successfully transfer to a 4-year institution, where the completion of Upper division and/or Graduate study will enhance their position when seeking employment.

    Supporting Rationale Alignment
  • Maintaining core programs and services
  • Increasing student success
  • Required Resources

    Current Revenue Stream

    Sale of artworks exhibited in the Gallery and other student art sales generate a 30% profit of the sales for the Gallery Foundation account.  Revenue amounts vary from year to year.

    Augmentation Requests

    None