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Art, Digital Art & Design Program

Butte College’s Art, Digital Art & Design Program
Hosts International Documentary Film Festival

The Butte College Art, Digital Art & Design (ADAD) program will host the IDA TRAVELING ROAD SHOW: Pare Lorentz Film Festival which is comprised of seven of the best documentaries from the last few years—along with four films from documentary pioneer Pare Lorentz..

The international documentary film festival begins November 16 at the Butte College Arts building, black box theatre, 3536 Butte Campus Drive. Sponsored in part by the International Documentary Association (IDA) the films address issues of social justice, pressing social problems, environmental or "green" themes, and appropriate use of the natural environment.

All films showcased have been recognized as significant contributors in the evolution of the documentary form, and have been named IDA/PARE LORENTZ AWARD winners by the IDA - the leading documentary association in North America. Supported by the New York Community Trust, this traveling documentary film festival is being offered to cinemas, film societies, universities and community groups free of charge for a limited time.

Free admission – 11:30-1:30 – Butte College Arts Building,
Black-box Theater

November 16, 17, 18 19 (Monday-Thursday)
November 23, 24 (Monday & Tuesday)

 


 

PARE LORENTZ AWARD WINNING FILMS

mandelaNovember 16th, 11:30 A.M.
MANDELA: SON OF AFRICA, FATHER OF A NATION
Directed by Jo Menell
118 Minutes - Winner 1997

MANDELA
A captivating view of the indomitable spirit of one of the world’s most fascinating figures, this full-length documentary follows Nelson Mandela from his early days and tribal education to his election as South Africa’s first black president. Providing insights into his early life, the film takes us through Mandela’s childhood, adolescence, career in law and first marriage. “Mandela” is an absorbing look at the courageous life, tribulations and fortitude of Mandela the leader, while never forgetting the engaging and charismatic spirit of Mandela the man, as seen through exclusive interviews and narration from Mandela himself.

 

 


garbageNovember 17th, 11:30 A.M.
GARBAGE WARRIOR
Directed by Oliver Hodge
86 Minutes
Honorable Mention 2008

GARBAGE WARRIOR
What do beer cans, car tires and water bottles have in common? Not much unless you're renegade architect Michael Reynolds, in which case they are tools of choice for producing thermal mass and energy-independent housing. For 30 years New Mexico-based Reynolds and his green disciples have devoted their time to advancing the art of "Earthship Biotecture" by building self-sufficient, off-the-grid communities where design and function converge in eco-harmony. However, these experimental structures that defy state standards create conflict between Reynolds and the authorities, who are backed by big business. Frustrated by antiquated legislation, Reynolds lobbies for the right to create a sustainable living test site. While politicians hum and ha, Mother Nature strikes, leaving communities devastated by tsunamis and hurricanes. Reynolds and his crew seize the opportunity to lend their pioneering skills to those who need it most.

"Charismatic - with a warm sense of humor" - New York Times

 


landscapeNovember 18th, 11:30 A.M.
AMERICA’S LOST LANDSCAPE: THE TALLGRASS PRAIRIE
Directed by David O’Shields
60 Minutes
Winner 2005

AMERICA’S LOST LANDSCAPE: THE TALLGRASS PRAIRIE
A rich and complex story of one of the most astonishing alterations of nature in human history. Prior to Euro-American settlement in the 1820s, one of the major landscape features of North America was 240 million acres of tallgrass prairie. But between 1830 and 1900 -- in the span of a single lifetime -- the prairie was steadily transformed to farmland. This drastic change in the landscape brought about an enormous social change for Native Americans. In an equally short time their cultural imprint was reduced in essence to a handful of place-names appearing on maps. The extraordinary cinematography of prairie remnants, original score and archival images are all delicately interwoven to create a powerful and moving viewing experience about the natural and cultural history of America.

 


sugiharaNovember 19th, 11:30 A.M.
SUGIHARA CONSPIRACY OF KINDNESS
Directed by Rob Kirk
103 Minutes
Winner 2000

SUGIHARA CONSPIRACY OF KINDNESS
In the fall of 1939, Hitler's murderous wave was sweeping through Eastern Europe. In the face of the Nazi onslaught, Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara set about saving thousands of lives. But his struggle was not fought on the battlefields or in war rooms. He used his power as a diplomat to rescue fleeing Jewish refugees


 

 



burningNovember 23rd, 11:30 A.M.
BURNING THE FUTURE: COAL IN AMERICA
Directed by David Novack
89 Minutes - Winner 2008

BURNING THE FUTURE
Burning the Future: Coal in America examines the explosive conflict between the coal industry and residents of West Virginia. Confronted by emerging “clean coal” energy policies, local activists watch a world blind to the devastation caused by coal's extraction. Faced with toxic ground water and the obliteration of 1.4 million acres of mountains, our heroes launch a valiant fight to arouse the nation's help in protecting their mountains, saving their families, and preserving their way of life.

“As upsetting as it is informative.”- NEW YORK TIMES

 

 

 


 

plowNovember 24th, 11:30 A.M.
THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS (1936)
With The Plow That Broke the Plains, his first film and the first US Government-sponsored documentary, Pare Lorentz won praise and wide recognition for using sensitive photography, dramatic editing and a beautiful score by composer Virgil Thomson to illuminate a local problem of national importance – the challenges faced by wheat farmers and cattle ranchers in the Great Plains. As the film climaxes in a vivid portrait of the record drought that produced the dust bowl and the plight of the "blown out, baked and broke" people who felt its impact, it becomes clear that a new master of the documentary form has found his voice. 25 minutes

Plus

riverTHE RIVER (1938)
In The River, Pare Lorentz deploys powerful images, a poetic Pulitzer Prize-nominated script and another score by Virgil Thomson to illustrate the problems of flood control on the Mississippi River and the efforts to correct it. While arguing that the building of dams would put an end to the destruction of crops and property brought about by the havoc of annual floods, Lorentz reveals the ways the river has been misused, and presents a stirring paen to America’s natural landscape, and the proud history with which it is imbued. 31 minutes

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Butte College | 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville CA 95965 | General Information 530.895.2511

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